Print Skip Navigation LinksHome/Research/Browse Archival Collections
 

The Arkansas State Archives houses approximately 13,000 cubic feet of state records and manuscript collections pertaining to the history of Arkansas and its people. These materials have been described and inventoried for ease of access. These inventories, called finding aids, are keyword searchable. You may also browse these finding aids alphabetically using the links below. Click the collection's title to view the finding aid.

Separated Materials:  Some archival collections contain materials that have been stored separately from the bulk of the collection due to those items' preservation needs. Generally, this affects collections that include artifacts that have been moved to the archives' museum collection, and the existence of artifacts in a collection has been noted in that collection's finding aid. Due to the nature of artifact and other separated materials, we require researchers to fill out an Artifact Access Form and send it in to state.archives@arkansas.gov, to schedule an appointment to view artifacts from the museum collection.  

0-9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | All

Search Clear

Collection Title: Quesenbury, William papers
Dates: 1860-1888
Summary:

The materials in this collection includes correspondence, a postscript remark, and literary works. Correspondence included are a letter to Judge John F. Wheeler discussing president of the Arkansas Press Association James Smithee and a photocopied letter to Elias Boudinot where ideas about history, poetry, and literature are reviewed. This collection has a postscript note regarding an error in the Argus Press which cited the wrong location of a speech given by an unknown orator. Literary works included are as follows: “Kansas” is concerning abolitionists; “The Others” is an article about a 4th of July celebration and a short history of prominent figures in Arkansas; "To the Mexican Veteran" is a poem honoring veterans; finally the “Carrier's Address to the Readers of the Western Independent” is a Christmas poem.